Spring Floral Compote Arrangement

I posted this in our Instagram story a while back and it was so popular I thought I'd share it here for anyone living it up like it's 2005 and still reading blogs. (Hey I'm right in 2005 with you obviously since I'm the one writing this blog for you to read.)

Anyway, here are a few iphone shots I took along the way of making a branchy spring compote arrangement. This eventually sat atop the bar at Stone Tower Winery for a beautiful March wedding. I'll post the professional photos from that wedding later this week - but for now let's allow my iphone to have all the glory.

1 - I used foam AND chicken wire as mechanics in this pretty rust brown compote. Reason being - it was for a wedding and had to withstand transport down a very long, very pot-hole-riddled dirt road. The chicken wire gave added support to the heavy branches - preventing them from ripping through the foam. Everything is taped in with clear, waterproof tape. The shape of the arrangement is established with this base layer of branches. My favorite shapes are somewhat asymmetrical - with a high side and a low side. That crab-leg aesthetic is strong here thanks to the tulip magnolia and some very lovely thorny quince from local Virginia flower farm Wollam Gardens.

1 - I used foam AND chicken wire as mechanics in this pretty rust brown compote. Reason being - it was for a wedding and had to withstand transport down a very long, very pot-hole-riddled dirt road. The chicken wire gave added support to the heavy branches - preventing them from ripping through the foam. Everything is taped in with clear, waterproof tape.

The shape of the arrangement is established with this base layer of branches. My favorite shapes are somewhat asymmetrical - with a high side and a low side. That crab-leg aesthetic is strong here thanks to the tulip magnolia and some very lovely thorny quince from local Virginia flower farm Wollam Gardens.

2 - For the second layer, I added lush dark green camellia foliage, followed by blush quicksand roses. These 2 elements followed along the line I established with the branches, and the camellia foliage helped cover some of the mechanics. Also if you're wondering about the bucket - I elevate my arrangements as I'm making them sometimes so it's at eye level. This arrangement would be sitting at about this height on the bar at Stone Tower - so I wanted to be sure things look their best from the angle it will be viewed.

2 - For the second layer, I added lush dark green camellia foliage, followed by blush quicksand roses. These 2 elements followed along the line I established with the branches, and the camellia foliage helped cover some of the mechanics.

Also if you're wondering about the bucket - I elevate my arrangements as I'm making them sometimes so it's at eye level. This arrangement would be sitting at about this height on the bar at Stone Tower - so I wanted to be sure things look their best from the angle it will be viewed.

3 - The next layer is my favorite little powerhouse ingredient - white majolika spray roses. These further disguised mechanics, and also helped add a draping effect to the outer rims of the compote.

3 - The next layer is my favorite little powerhouse ingredient - white majolika spray roses. These further disguised mechanics, and also helped add a draping effect to the outer rims of the compote.

4 - Next up, ranunculus. That one right in the front was the biggest ever - so right in the front is where it belonged. I used gradually smaller ranunculus as they got higher in the arrangement, with small little buds quivering over the heavier focal blooms. Again, they follow the general lines established by the branch base layer.

4 - Next up, ranunculus. That one right in the front was the biggest ever - so right in the front is where it belonged. I used gradually smaller ranunculus as they got higher in the arrangement, with small little buds quivering over the heavier focal blooms. Again, they follow the general lines established by the branch base layer.

5 - The top and final layer are the most delicate blooms. I added subtle antique helleborus, which helped to further fill in and add additional draping at the bottom. Also dramatic white and black anemone for contrast and movement. At some point I added in thistle and silver brunia as extra little textures too.

5 - The top and final layer are the most delicate blooms. I added subtle antique helleborus, which helped to further fill in and add additional draping at the bottom. Also dramatic white and black anemone for contrast and movement. At some point I added in thistle and silver brunia as extra little textures too.

Here's the finished arrangement in its final place at the Stone Tower Winery bar. We ended up adding even more quince after this photo. You can never have too much quince. Also I ended up having to replace that huge ranunculus in the front so it looks a little different here. Truth is I tried to photograph this in the snow and it fell on its face. The ranunculus in the front was the only victim - it's poofy soft layers cushioning the fall for everyone. A true selfless sacrifice. (This is why you have extra flowers on hand.)

Here's the finished arrangement in its final place at the Stone Tower Winery bar. We ended up adding even more quince after this photo. You can never have too much quince. Also I ended up having to replace that huge ranunculus in the front so it looks a little different here. Truth is I tried to photograph this in the snow and it fell on its face. The ranunculus in the front was the only victim - it's poofy soft layers cushioning the fall for everyone. A true selfless sacrifice. (This is why you have extra flowers on hand.)

If you'd like to join me on instagram, where I spend most of my time lately, you'll find me at www.instagram.com/lori_tran.